About / Contact

I am a passionate advocate and activist on behalf of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) communities.

I have been involved in a range of LGBTI rights organisations, including as the Policy Working Group Chair of both the Victorian and NSW Gay & Lesbian Rights Lobbies. I have also served as a federal political adviser, although I am currently not involved in any political party.

This blog will primarily discuss legal and policy issues that affect LGBTI Australians, with posts on anti-discrimination legislation (including religious exceptions and protections against vilification) and marriage equality, as well as other LGBTI law reform, health and education matters.

Other articles will focus on ‘culture’ (including book, TV and film reviews) and secularism/the separation of church and state. As usual, all views expressed are my own, and not those of any employer, past or present.

If you have enjoyed reading my blog, please consider signing up to receive posts direct to your inbox (the email signup box is located in the top right corner of the desktop page, or towards the bottom of the page on mobile).

I also tweet regularly @alawriedejesus and am the admin of the No Homophobia No Exceptions Facebook page.

Finally, if you have a question, or would like to get in contact, please submit your details below:

NB The header images are a picture of the late Frank Kameny of the Mattachine Society of Washington, which he founded in 1961 and which popularised the phrase ‘Gay is Good’, and a photo of the late Lex Watson, addressing activists at the Gay Rights Embassy which had been established outside the house of then NSW Premier Neville Wran.

One thought on “About / Contact

  1. Alastair, As a straight, female, and voracious tennis fan I found this post to be very well written, and your observations to be extremely insightful. It is unfortunate that the international atmosphere is so homophobic that male players and some female as well, do not feel they can be open about who they are, but must remain in the closet. Hopefully this will change in the not too distant future. Here in the US there are only a handful of male professional athletes who have felt safe and brave enough to come out while still playing. Thanks for writing about this subject.

    Like

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